The Burying Party, review

Based on war poet Wilfred Owen, The Burying Party shows the deep seeded trauma of war as he considers going back to put his life on the line.

Wlifred Owen is considered one of the most well-known and highly acclaimed First World war poets however not everyone will know of his story. The Burying Party smartly conveys his life with beauty and accuracy, including his longing to go back to the war and his sexuality in understated ways.

Focusing on Wilfred (Matthew Staite) as he meets certain literary figures during the final years of his life, the film flicks between past memories of the war and his present life in which he contemplates going back. During these scenes we occasionally hear voiceovers of his poems which create an atmosphere like no other. Ordinarily techinques like this are employed to give some form of exposition rather than what director Richard Weston has done which is to have them as an accompanying piece, to assist with the mood and tone.

It swiftly deals with the effects of war, including PTSD as well as that sense of missing the conflict, something which is more common than you may think. Creating some beautiful scenery to go with such difficult issues, the contrast works well as Cinematographer Meurig Marshall crafts his shot and never wastes a chance to show off the view. 

An interesting look at the First World war and what soldiers went through, whether it was during a conflict, its aftermath or being home, The Burying Party is a perfect example of dealing with certain issues in a short amount of time but whilst also making you realise just how difficult things would have been.

4 out of 5.

Keep. It. Reel.

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